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A Look at Medicare & Medigap Policies

 


This guide is about Medigap policies. It was written to help people with Medicare understand Medigap (also called Medicare Supplement Insurance) policies. A Medigap policy is health insurance sold by private insurance companies to fill gaps in the Original Medicare Plan coverage. Medigap policies help pay your share (coinsurance, copayments, or deductibles) of the costs of Medicare-covered services. Some Medigap policies cover certain costs not covered by the Original Medicare Plan. However, before you learn more about Medigap policies, here's a brief look at the Medicare Program.

 

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The Medicare Program
 
 

Medicare is health insurance for people age 65 or older, under age 65 with certain disabilities, and any age with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant). Medicare covers many health care services and supplies, but there are many costs (gaps) it doesn't cover. Medicare has:

 

  • Part A (Hospital Insurance) - helps cover your inpatient care in hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, hospice care, and some home health care if you meet certain conditions.
  • Part B (Medical Insurance) - helps cover medically-necessary services like doctors services and outpatient care, other medical services that Part A doesn't cover (like physical and occupational therapists), and some home health. Also helps cover some preventive services to help maintain your health and to keep certain illnesses from getting worse.
  • Part C (Medicare Advantage Plans) - private insurers like HMOs and PPOs provide Part A, Part B, and, sometimes, Part D coverage to people who enroll.
  • Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage) - helps cover prescription drug costs.

 

Medicare allows you the flexibility of choosing a plan that meets your needs. It's important to review your coverage every year. Plan costs and benefits change, and so can your health. The coverage that worked for you this year might still meet your needs or, there might be a better option. Medicare offers many different types of plans. If you're satisfied with your current plans cost and coverage for next year and the customer service you get, you don't need to do anything. With Medicare, you can choose how you get your health care and prescription drug coverage. You have the following options:

 

  • The Original Medicare Plan, managed by the Federal government, provides your Medicare Part A and Part B coverage. This plan pays for many health care services and supplies, but it doesn't pay all of your health care costs. There are costs that you must pay (like coinsurance, copayments, and deductibles). These are also called out-of-pocket costs, or cost-sharing.
  • If you have the Original Medicare Plan, you may want to buy a Medigap policy to help cover these out-of-pocket costs. Generally, you must have Medicare Part A and Part B to buy a Medigap policy. A Medigap policy only works with the Original Medicare Plan.
  • If you have the Original Medicare Plan and you want to get Medicare prescription drug coverage, you must join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan.
  • Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C), like HMOs and PPOs, are another way to get Medicare benefits. These plans are health plan options approved by Medicare and run by private companies. These plans sometimes provide extra benefits that aren't included under the Original Medicare Plan. Medicare Advantage Plans include Medicare Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Plans, Medicare Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plans, Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), Medicare Special Needs Plans (SNPs), and Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA) Plans.

 

Important: If you have a Medigap policy and you are switching from the Original Medicare Plan to a Medicare Advantage Plan, you don't need and can't use the Medigap policy to cover deductibles, copayments, or coinsurance under the Medicare Advantage Plan. You may want to drop your Medigap policy, but you should talk to your State Health Insurance Assistance Program and your current Medigap insurance company before you do because you may not be able to get it back. If you already have a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for anyone to sell you a Medigap policy unless you are switching back to the Original Medicare Plan.

 

 

  • Other Medicare Plans are plans that aren't Medicare Advantage Plans, but are still part of the Medicare Program. Other Medicare health plans include Medicare Cost Plans, Demonstrations/Pilot Programs, and Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). These plans provide Part A and Part B coverage, and some also provide Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage).
  • Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage
    (also called Part D) Medicare offers prescription drug coverage for everyone with Medicare. Medicare drug plans are run by insurance companies and other private companies approved by Medicare. There are two ways to get Medicare prescription drug coverage:
    1. Join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan. These plans (sometimes called PDPs) add prescription drug coverage to the Original Medicare Plan, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans, some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans. 2. Join a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO) or another Medicare health plan that includes prescription drug coverage. You get all of your Medicare coverage (Part A and Part B), including prescription drugs (Part D), through these plans. These plans are sometimes called  MA-PDs. When you join a Medicare Advantage Plan, you will get coverage through that plan, not through the Original Medicare Plan.  Back to top

 

 Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage and Medigap Policies

 

 

If you bought your Medigap policy before January 1, 2006, you may have a Medigap policy with prescription drug coverage. You can keep the prescription drug coverage in that policy or you can join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan. If you join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, you must tell your Medigap insurance company. It will remove the prescription drug coverage from your Medigap policy. This is because you can't have both types of prescription drug coverage at the same time. If you are in the Original Medicare Plan and already have a Medigap policy without prescription drug coverage, you can join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan without changing your Medigap policy.  Back to top

 

What is a Medigap policy?


A Medigap (also called Medicare Supplement Insurance) policy is private health insurance specifically designed to supplement the Original Medicare Plan. This means it helps pay some of the health care costs (gaps) that the Original Medicare Plan doesn't cover (like coinsurance and deductibles). Medigap policies may also cover certain things that Medicare doesn't cover. If you are in the Original Medicare Plan and you buy a Medigap policy, then both plans will pay their share of the Medicare-approved amount for covered health care costs. Medigap policies are sold by private insurance companies. Also, a Medigap policy isn't a Medicare Health Plan (like an HMO or PPO) because it's not a way to get Medicare benefits. Insurance companies can sell you only a "standardized" Medigap policy. Standardized Medigap policies are identified by letters (Medigap Plans A through L) as described in this booklet (except in Massachusetts, Minnesota, or Wisconsin.  Medigap Plans F and J also offer a high-deductible option.  In some states, you may be able to buy another type of Medigap policy called Medicare SELECT.  Each type of Medigap policy offers the same basic benefits, no matter which insurance company sells it. Usually the only difference between Medigap policies sold by different insurance companies is the cost.  Medigap policies must follow Federal and state laws. These laws protect you. The front of a Medigap policy must clearly identify it as Medicare Supplement Insurance. A Medigap policy only covers one person. If you and your spouse both want Medigap coverage, you each must buy separate Medigap policies.  Back to top

 

What Medigap policies don't cover


Medigap policies don't cover long-term care (like care in a nursing home), vision or dental care, hearing aids, eyeglasses, and private-duty nursing.  Back to top

 

Types of coverage that are NOT Medigap policies

 

  • Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C), like an HMO, PPO, or Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans
  • Medicare Prescription Drug Plans (Part D)
  • Medicaid
  • Employer or union plans, including Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP)
  • TRICARE
  • Veterans' benefits
  • Long-term care insurance policies
  • Indian Health Service, Tribal and Urban plans  Back to top

 

 What types of Medigap policies can insurance companies sell?


In most cases, Medigap insurance companies can sell you only a "standardized" Medigap policy. All Medigap policies must have specific benefits so you can compare them easily. See page 9. If you live in Massachusetts, Minnesota, or Wisconsin.


Remember, insurance companies that sell Medigap policies don't have to offer every Medigap policy (Medigap Plans A through L). However, they must offer Medigap Plan A if they offer any other Medigap policy. Each insurance company decides which Medigap policies it wants to sell.In some cases, an insurance company must sell you a Medigap policy, even if you have health problems. Listed below are certain times that you are guaranteed the right to buy a Medigap policy: 

 

  • If you are in your Medigap open enrollment period.
  • If you have a guaranteed issue right.

 

You may also be able to buy a Medigap policy at other times, but the insurance company is allowed to deny you a Medigap policy based on your health. Also, in some cases it may be illegal for the insurance company to sell you a Medigap policy (such as if you already have Medicaid or a Medicare Advantage Plan).  Back to top

 

 

What do I need to know if I want to buy a Medigap policy?


When you buy a Medigap policy, in almost all cases you must have Medicare Part A and Part B. Therefore, you will have to continue to pay the monthly Medicare Part B premium. You will also have to pay a premium to the Medigap insurance company. You can buy a Medigap policy from any insurance company that is licensed in your state to sell one to you. If you want to buy a Medigap policy, follow the steps to buying or switching a Medigap policy. Any new Medigap policy is guaranteed renewable. This means the insurance company can't cancel your Medigap policy as long as you pay the premium.


Although some Medigap policies sold in the past covered prescription drugs, no new Medigap policies are allowed to include prescription drug coverage. If you want prescription drug coverage, you may want to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan (Part D) offered by private companies approved by Medicare.  Back to top

 

When is the best time to buy a Medigap policy?


The best time to buy a Medigap policy is during your Medigap open enrollment period. This period lasts for 6 months and begins on the first day of the month in which you are both age 65 or older and enrolled in Medicare Part B. During this period, an insurance company can't use medical underwriting. This means it can't :

 

  • refuse to sell you any Medigap policy it sells,
  • make you wait for coverage to start (except as explained below), or
  • charge you more for a Medigap policy because of your health problems.

 

While the insurance company can't make you wait for your coverage to start, it may be able to make you wait for coverage of a pre-existing condition. A pre-existing condition is a health problem you have before the date a new insurance policy starts. In some cases, the Medigap insurance company can refuse to cover your out-of-pocket costs for health problems for up to 6 months. This is called a pre-existing condition waiting period. (Remember, for Medicare-covered services, the Original Medicare Plan will still cover the condition, even if the Medigap policy won't cover your out-of-pocket costs.)  Even if you have a pre-existing condition, if you buy a Medigap policy during your Medigap open enrollment period and if you recently had certain kinds of health coverage called creditable coverage, the insurance company must shorten or eliminate the waiting period. There are many types of health care coverage that may count as creditable coverage for Medigap policies, but they will only count if you didn't have a break in coverage. A break in coverage means you are without any creditable health coverage for more than 63 days in a row.

 

Talk to your Medigap insurance company. It will be able to tell you if your previous coverage will count as creditable coverage for its purpose. If you buy a Medigap policy when you have a guaranteed issue right (also called Medigap protections), the insurance company can't use a pre-existing condition waiting period at all.


 

Note: You can send in your application for a Medigap policy before your Medigap open enrollment period starts. This may be important if you currently have coverage that will end when you turn age 65. This will allow you to have continuous coverage.  Back to top

 

 

Why is it important to buy a Medigap policy when I am first eligible?


It is very important to understand your Medigap open enrollment period. During your Medigap open enrollment period you can buy any Medigap policy the company sells. If you apply for coverage outside of your Medigap open enrollment period, there is no guarantee that an insurance company will sell you a Medigap policy unless you are eligible. Also, after your Medigap open enrollment period ends, Medigap insurance companies are allowed to use medical underwriting to decide whether to accept your application and how much to charge you for the Medigap policy. To best understand your Medigap rights, you should be familiar with certain rules about Medicare Part B because your Medigap rights may depend on when you enroll in Medicare Part B. There are only certain times when you can enroll in Medicare Part B. If you don't enroll in Medicare Part B when you are first eligible (or during a special enrollment period, such as after you drop or lose employer coverage), you may have to pay a late-enrollment penalty (higher monthly premium) for Medicare Part B. You may have to pay this extra amount as long as you have Medicare Part B.If you are over age 65 and have group health coverage because you are currently working or covered under your spouse's employer group health plan, you may want to wait to enroll in Medicare Part B. See below. Your Medigap open enrollment period won't start until you are age 65 or older and have enrolled in Medicare Part B.  Back to top

 

How insurance companies set prices for Medigap policies


Each insurance company sets its own monthly premiums, and decides how it will set the price. It is important to ask how an insurance company prices Medigap policies. The way they set the price affects how much you pay now and in the future. Medigap policies can be priced or "rated" in 3 ways:

 

  1. Community-rated (also called "no-age-rated"
  2. Issue-age-rated
  3. Attained-age-rated

 

Each of these ways of pricing Medigap policies is described in the chart on the next page. The examples show how your age affects your premiums, and why it is important to look at how much the Medigap policy will cost you now and in the future. The amounts in the examples aren't actual costs.  Back to top

 

 

Comparing Medigap costs


As discussed on the previous pages, the cost of Medigap policies can vary widely. There can be big differences in the premiums that different insurance companies charge for exactly the same coverage. As you shop for a Medigap policy, be sure you are comparing the same type of Medigap policy, and taking into consideration the type of pricing that the Medigap policy uses. (For example, compare a Medigap Plan C from one insurance company with Medigap Plan C from another insurance company.) Although this guide can't give actual costs of Medigap policies, you can get this information by calling insurance companies. Or, call your State Health Insurance Assistance Program.

 

The cost of your Medigap policy may also depend on if the insurance company:

  

  • offers discounts (such as discounts for females, non-smokers, or people who are married; discounts for paying annually; or discounts for paying your premiums using electronic funds transfer).
  • uses medical underwriting, or applies a different premium when you don't have a guaranteed issue right.
  • sells Medicare SELECT policies. If you buy this type of Medigap policy, your premium may be less.
  • offers a high-deductible option on Medigap Plans F and J. If you buy a Medigap Plan F or J high-deductible option, you must pay the first $1,900 (high-deductible in 2008) in Medigap-covered costs before the Medigap policy pays anything. You must also pay a separate deductible for foreign travel emergency ($250 per year). If you bought your Medigap Plan J before December 31, 2005 and it still covers prescription drugs, you would also pay a separate deductible for prescription drugs ($250 per year) covered by the Medigap policy.  Back to top

 

What is Medicare SELECT?


There is another type of Medigap policy called Medicare SELECT that is sold in some states. Medicare SELECT can be any of the standardized Medigap Plans A through L. However, you must use specific hospitals and, in some cases, specific doctors to get your full insurance benefits (except in an emergency). Medicare SELECT policies generally cost less than other Medigap policies. However, if you don't use a Medicare SELECT hospital or doctor for non-emergency services, you will have to pay some or all of what Medicare doesn't pay. Medicare will pay its share of approved charges no matter which hospital or doctor you choose.  Back to top

 

Medigap Claim Filing for Medicare Part B


In most Medigap policies, when you sign the Medigap insurance contract you agree to have the Medigap insurance company get your Medicare Part B claim information directly from Medicare and then pay the doctor directly. Some Medigap insurance companies also provide this service for Medicare Part A claims.


If your Medigap insurance company doesn't provide this service, ask your doctors if they "participate" in Medicare. (This means that they accept "assignment" for all their Medicare patients.) If your doctor does participate, the Medigap insurance company is required to pay the doctor directly if you request.  Back to top
 

 

I lost (or dropped) my health care coverage.

Can I buy a Medigap policy?


In some cases you have a guaranteed issue right to buy a Medigap policy, if, for example, your health care coverage ended. Make sure:

 

  • a copy of any letters, notices, and/or claim denials as proof of coverage that has your name on it, and
  • the postmarked envelope these papers come in as proof of when it was mailed.
  

It is important to keep this information because you may need to send a copy of some or all of these papers with your Medigap application to prove you have a guaranteed issue right.It is best to apply for a Medigap policy before your current health coverage has ended. You can apply for a Medigap policy while you are still in your health plan and choose to start your Medigap coverage the day after your health plan coverage ends. This will prevent breaks in your health coverage.  Back to top

 

 

Watch out for illegal insurance practices


It is illegal for anyone to:

 

  • pressure you into buying a Medigap (Medicare Supplement Insurance) policy, or lie to or mislead you to switch from one company or policy to another.
  • sell you a second Medigap policy when they know that you already have one, unless you tell the insurance company in writing that you plan to cancel your existing Medigap policy.
  • sell you a Medigap policy if they know you have Medicaid, except in certain situations.
  • sell you a Medigap policy if they know you are in a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO, PPO, or Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plan) (unless your coverage under the Medicare Advantage Plan will end before the effective date of the Medigap policy).
  • claim that a Medigap policy is part of the Medicare Program or any other Federal program. Medigap is private health insurance.
  • claim that a Medicare Advantage Plan is a Medigap policy.
  • sell you a Medigap policy that can't legally be sold in your state. Check with your State Insurance Department to make sure that the Medigap policy you are interested in can be sold in your state.
  • misuse the names, letters, or symbols of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), Social Security Administration (SSA), Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), or any of their various programs like Medicare. (For example, suggesting the Medigap policy has been approved or recommended by the Federal government.)
  • claim to be a Medicare representative if they work for a Medigap insurance company.

 

Once you decide on the insurance company and the Medigap policy you want, you should apply for your Medigap policy. The insurance company must give you a clearly worded summary of your Medigap policy when you apply. Read it carefully. If you don't understand it, ask questions. Remember the following when you buy your Medigap policy:

 

  • Filling out your application.
    Fill the application out carefully and completely. If the insurance agent fills out the application, review it to make sure it's correct. Answer all of the medical questions carefully. If you buy your Medigap policy during your Medigap open enrollment period or provide evidence that you are entitled to a guaranteed issue period, the insurance company can't use any medical answers you give them to deny you a Medigap policy or change the price.
  • Paying for your Medigap policy.
    It is best to pay for your Medigap policy by check, money order, or bank draft. Make it payable to the insurance company, not the agent. If buying from an agent, get a receipt with the insurance company's name, address, and telephone number for your records.
  • Starting your Medigap policy.
    Ask for your Medigap policy to become effective when you want coverage to start. Generally, Medigap policies begin the first of the month after you apply. (Note: If you already have a Medigap policy, ask for your new Medigap policy to become effective when your old Medigap policy coverage ends.) If, for any reason, the insurance company won't give you the start date you want, call your State Insurance Department.
  • Getting your Medigap policy.
    If you don't get your Medigap policy in 30 days, call your insurance company. If you don't get your Medigap policy in 60 days, call your State Insurance Department.
.

Remember, you don't need more than one Medigap policy. If you already have a Medigap policy, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a second policy unless you tell them in writing that you will cancel the first Medigap policy. However, don't cancel your old Medigap policy until the new one is in place, and you decide to keep it.  Once you receive the new Medigap policy, you have 30 days to decide if you want to keep the new Medigap policy. This is called your "free look" period. The 30-day free look period begins on the day you get your Medigap policy.  Back to top

 

 

Switching Medigap policies


If you're satisfied with your current Medigap policy's cost and coverage and the customer service you receive, you don't need to do anything. If you are thinking about switching to a new Medigap policy, the following pages answer some common questions about switching Medigap policies.


Can I switch to a different Medigap policy?


In most cases, you won't have a right under Federal law to switch Medigap policies, unless you are within your 6-month Medigap open enrollment period or are eligible under a specific circumstance for guaranteed issue rights. But, if your state has more generous requirements, or the insurance company is willing to sell you a Medigap policy, make sure you compare benefits and premiums before switching Medigap policies. If you bought your Medigap policy before 1992, it may offer coverage that isn't available in a newer Medigap policy. On the other hand, older Medigap policies might not be guaranteed renewable and might have bigger premium increases than newer standardized Medigap policies currently being sold. If you decide to switch, don't cancel your first Medigap policy until you have decided to keep the second Medigap policy. On the application for the new Medigap policy, you will have to promise that you will cancel your first Medigap policy. You have 30 days to decide if you want to keep the new Medigap policy. This is called your "free look" period. The 30-day free look period starts when you get your new Medigap policy. You will need to pay both premiums for a month, but it may help you avoid a costly mistake.


Do I have to switch Medigap policies if I have an older Medigap policy?

 

No. If you have an older Medigap policy that you bought before 1992, you don?t have to switch to one of the standardized Medigap policies. If you buy a newer Medigap policy, you won't be able to go back to your old Medigap policy because older Medigap policies can no longer be sold.

 

 

Do I have to wait a certain length of time after I buy my first Medigap policy before I can switch to a different Medigap policy?

 

No. You should be aware that if you have had your old Medigap policy for less than 6 months, the Medigap insurance company may be able to make you wait up to 6 months for coverage of a pre-existing condition. However, if your old Medigap policy had the same benefits, and you had it for 6 months or more, the new insurance company can't exclude your pre-existing condition. If you've had your Medigap policy less than 6 months, the number of months you've had your current Medigap policy must be subtracted from the time you must wait before your new Medigap policy covers your pre-existing condition.

 

If the new Medigap policy has a benefit that isn't in your current Medigap policy, you may still have to wait up to 6 months before that benefit will be covered, regardless of how long you have had your current Medigap policy.

 

Can I keep my current Medigap policy (or Medicare SELECT policy) or switch to a different Medigap policy if I move out-of-state?

 

 

You can keep your current Medigap policy regardless of where you live as long as you are still in the Original Medicare Plan. If you want to switch to a different Medigap policy, you will have to check with the new insurance company to see if they will offer you a different Medigap policy. You may have to pay more for your new Medigap policy and answer some medical questions if you are buying a Medigap policy outside of your Medigap open enrollment period.  If you move and want to switch to a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have the right to keep your Medigap policy, but your Medigap policy won't work with your Medicare Advantage Plan.  Back to top

 

 

Losing Medigap coverage:

Can my Medigap Insurance company drop me?

 

If you bought your Medigap policy after 1992, in most cases the Medigap insurance company can't drop you because the Medigap policy is guaranteed renewable. This means your insurance company can't drop you unless:

 

  • you stop paying your premium,
  • you weren't truthful about something on the Medigap policy application, or
  • the insurance company becomes bankrupt or insolvent.

However, if you bought your Medigap policy before 1992, it might not be guaranteed renewable. At the time these Medigap policies were sold, state laws might not have required that these Medigap policies be guaranteed renewable. This means the Medigap insurance company can refuse to renew the Medigap policy, as long as it gets the states approval to cancel your Medigap policy. However, if this does happen, you have the right to buy another Medigap policy.  Back to top

 

 

Medigap policies and Medicare prescription drug coverage

 

If you bought a Medigap policy before December 31, 2005 and it has coverage for prescription drugs. Medicare now offers prescription drug coverage (Part D) for everyone with Medicare. If you have a Medigap policy with prescription drug coverage, that means you chose not to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan when you were first eligible. However, you can still join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan. Your situation may have changed in ways that make a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan fit your needs better than the prescription drug coverage in your Medigap policy. It is a good idea to review your coverage each fall, because you can join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan from November 15 -December 31 each year.  Back to top

 

 

Medigap policies for people under age 65 and

eligible for Medicare due to a disability or

End-Stage Renal Disease

 

You may have Medicare before age 65 due to:

 

  • a disability, or
  • ESRD (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney
    transplant).

If you are a person with Medicare under age 65 and have a disability or ESRD, you might not be able to buy the Medigap (also called "Medicare Supplement Insurance") policy you want, or any Medigap policy, until you turn age 65. Federal law doesn't require insurance companies to sell Medigap policies to people under age 65. However, some states require Medigap insurance companies to sell you a Medigap policy, even if you are under age 65. These states are listed below.

 

California*
Colorado
Connecticut
Hawaii
Illinois (after June 2008)
Kansas
Kentucky
LouisianaMaine
Maryland
Massachusetts*
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
New Hampshire
New JerseyNew York
North Carolina
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas
Vermont*
Wisconsin*

 

In California, Massachusetts, and Vermont a Medigap policy isn't available to people with ESRD under age 65. Even if your state isn't on the list, some insurance companies may voluntarily sell Medigap policies to people under age 65, although they will probably cost you more than Medigap policies sold to people over age 65. Check with your state about what rights you might have under state law.Remember, if you are already enrolled in Medicare Part B, you will get a Medigap open enrollment period when you turn age 65. You will probably have a wider choice of Medigap policies and be able to get a lower premium at that time. During the Medigap open enrollment period, insurance companies can't refuse to sell you any Medigap policy due to a disability or other health problem, or charge you a higher premium (based on health status) than they charge other people who are age 65.Because Medicare (Part A and/or Part B) is creditable coverage, if you had Medicare for more than 6 months before you turned age 65, you probably won't have a pre-existing condition waiting period.  Back to top
 
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